“CAN I GET MY CAR BACK AFTER REPOSSESSION BY FILING BANKRUPTCY”? (THE LETTER “Y” IS FOR YO-YO AUTO SALES}

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By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com

Website: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

A yo-yo sale is a consumer vehicle purchase under a valid signed agreement of installment sale which is followed, days or weeks later, by a phone call from a sales person at the agency that sold the vehicle who states that the consumer must return the vehicle, get a co-signer for the loan or sign new paperwork typically because, “the financing fell through.” Of course, this is impossible because the financing was locked in before the car was ever delivered but even so the befuddled consumer will fall for this line and present himself and his vehicle at the dealership for a new round of negotiations.

The way this scheme plays out the dishonest dealer will either negotiate more favorable terms after the fact or to repossess the car and resell it.   With touch ups to the paint and an (illegal) odometer rollback, he may be able to  pass it off as brand new. While yoyo sales are actually quite illegal under various federal and also state laws, they are quite prevalent especially in economic downturns. And they can result in the loss of your vehicle to repossession and oftentimes with it all the valuable property you left within it.

With the help of a skilled attorney, Yoyo’s can often be prevented especially if reported right away so they can be documented while in progress. However, you must still at least pay according to the original terms of the installment agreement or the vehicle can legitimately be repossessed by the dealer or the creditor.

Oftentimes, the Yo-yo victim, not knowing what to do or where to turn will simply stop paying his or her car payment entirely.  This is a very bad idea because they will have then not complied with the terms of the original agreement and have lost most if not all of the ammunition needed to fight the Yo-yo legally but also will ultimately lose the vehicle as well to the repo man. What remedies may be left to help you to get your car back in such a situation? Well, bankruptcy may still help, to a greater or lesser degree, depending on whether you elect to proceed under a chapter 13 or a 7.

SO, CAN I GET MY CAR BACK AFTER REPOSSESSION BY FILING A CHAPTER 13 BANKRUPTCY?

If your car has already been taken out of your driveway, and if it has not yet been sold, you can get the car back in a Chapter 13. See Note 1 below. You will not need to come current (as you do in a Chapter 7, see below), but will just have to be able to make regular Chapter 13 car payments, which will almost always be smaller than the payments that you were making before filing. See Note 2 below for an example of how the car payments can be reduced.  You usually also have to pay a reasonable repossession fee, these range in the hundreds of dollars, and wait anywhere from one week to a couple of months before getting it back.

Most vehicle lenders  will return a car voluntarily once you file a chapter 13 (provided the car is not already sold) if you show adequate insurance. This policy generally must include collision and name the finance company as a loss payee, i.e. the policy must mention the loan companyby name as the entity which gets paid first in the event of a loss or claim.

But why deal with the delay, inconvenience, added expense and potential damage to your car and/or loss of personal property involved in a typical repossession? A Chapter 13 filed before the repo man does his dirty work is your best bet.

CALL ME IF YOU ARE BEHIND IN PAYMENTS AND WE CAN AVOID THIS NASTY SCENARIO AND LOWER YOUR PAYMENTS TO BOOT. See Note 2 below.

BUT, CAN I ALSO GET MY CAR BACK AFTER REPOSSESSION BY FILING A CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY:

In a Chapter 7, no, you cannot get the car back without the creditor’s permission because chapter 7 involves liquidation of the debtor’s non-exempt property. The only way that most creditors are going to agree to return your car to you is if you are able to catch up on the payments right away and sometimes the creditor will not even accept this but will accelerate the note and demand the entire balance due and owing on the vehicle. So, there is virtually no difference between this and not filing at all in terms of what you have to pay.

A Chapter 7 filed before repossession will stop the repo man temporarily, but it won’t take long for the creditor to get the court’s permission for relief from the stay and take the car anyway. The only sure way to save a car is in a Chapter 13, unless you can find a way to pay the value of the car in one lump sum but if you can chances are you probably aren’t thinking about bankruptcy.

Note 1:   In Pennsylvania where I practice, you can stop the repo man from coming on your property to take your car if you are watchful enough to spot him in the act.  That is trespass.  It is however suggested that if you meet with resistance, you call 911 and summon the local constabulary rather than attempt to defend the property yourself. This of course is not true for a sheriff who enters upon real properly with a valid writ of execution or if your car is parked on a public thoroughfare or in the parking area of your apartment building, since you do not own it.

Note 2:   For instance, let’s say you have a car that is worth $15,000.00, on which you still owe $20,000, and are paying $519.00 per month at 19% interest on a 60 month note. (This is only an example…every situation will vary.) I can always lower the interest rate down to 2 or 3 points above the prime rate and in many cases, assuming you have owned the vehicle long enough; we can set the payments based on the $15,000 valuation, rather than the $20,000 debt.

In this example, the monthly payments would be reduced to roughly $380.00, for a savings of $139 per month or a whopping $8,325 over the life of the loan, (based on the WSJ prime rate quote for 11/8/2012 of 3.25 plus 2% Risk Factor or 5.25% total.) If we are able to drop the loan down to $15,000 the payment would be only about $285 per month, for a savings of $234 per month. The same thing applies to boats, RV’s, motorcycles, motor homes, appliances, furniture, electronics, and any other secured property, except for primary residences.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, 2012. All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  


I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Other lawyers asking “Y” include:

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Z is for “Zealous”, How far can your Lawyer go in representing you in Bankruptcy?

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

“Have Gun, Will travel”

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Richard Boone as Paladin

Z is for Zealous.

Subsection 2 of the preamble to the Pennsylvania Rules of Professional Conduct: (“RPC”) “A Lawyer’s Responsibilities” states thatas advocate for his/her clients, “a lawyer zealously asserts the client’s position under the rules of the adversary system”.

Sounds simple enough but of course, the RPC nowhere gives any guidance as to the meaning of the word “Zealous”. Encarta defines the term simply as: “actively and unreservedly enthusiastic”. It is a sort of “boundary” term in the law in that we come to understand what it means more by understanding what we as lawyers serving bankruptcy clients can and cannot do in its name.  So let’s approach it from that angle.

A prerequisite for zealous representation is competence: RPC Rule 1.1 states that a lawyer shall provide competent representation to a client. Competent representation requires the legal expertise, skill, thoroughness and preparation reasonably necessary for the representation. In the bankruptcy context this means that a lawyer must have studied and understood the aspects of the Bankruptcy Code that are implicated in any representation.  Even if this requirement is met in general, should he or she not be well versed in a particular sub-area, there is a duty to seek the assistance and mentoring of another attorney who has the requisite skill set. For example, the implications of divorce for bankruptcy are so complex and localized/varied to the laws of each of the several United State as to be beyond the ken of most bankruptcy lawyers and equally so for most divorce specialists…cross disciplinary expertise must often be sought to answer these questions.

However, it is clear that the lawyer who is competent is not thereby necessarily zealous.  Zealous representation, which is not defined in the RPC, serves for most as the benchmark for excellence. Perry Mason may not have had all it its legal points correct but it does stand in the eyes of the public as the more dinified epitome of this attribute. For those who consider law practice more a profession than a business, it evokes the image of a crusader for justice. To others, however it suggests a fanatical, “no-holds-barred” advocate, willing to do anything for a client (for a fee). A hired gun… Have gun, will travel. 

Thus, being overly “zealous” clearly can land a lawyer in deep trouble.  Some attorneys have attempted to use it to justify unacceptable conduct even though it may have disciplinary or malpractice liability consequences (or both).  For example, we bankruptcy lawyers frequently are asked clients for advice on what might be called “pre-bankruptcy asset protection planning.”  While the ethical dangers associated with advice in this area are very real [See, for example, Ohio Rules of Professional Conduct (“ORPC”) Section 8.4(c), prohibiting a lawyer from engaging in conduct involving fraud], the consequences can reach beyond the realm of ethics and involve actual criminal liability for both transgressing client and counsel. This will reach to knowingly assisting a client who wishes to perpetrate a fraud on the bankruptcy court.  See my blog on the topic of Bankruptcy Fraud for more information. For example, in a recent West Virginia case a bankruptcy lawyer was criminally indicted for advising his clients to transfer a mobile home to a relative before bankruptcy so as to attempt to “remove” the asset from the reach of the Trustee in Bankruptcy.

Thus while lawyers clearly have an obligation to advance their clients’ cases with competence and enthusiasm, they also have an obligation as officers of the bankruptcy court they serve to refrain from knowingly counseling or assisting a client to commit a crime or fraud. RCP 1.2 (d).

Picture credit: Wikpedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Have_Gun_%E2%80%93_Will_Travel

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  


I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2012, All Rights Reserved

Picture credit: Wikpedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Have_Gun_%E2%80%93_Will_Travel

M is for Matrimonial Property Obligations and the Discharge in Bankruptcy

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

    M by BigBlue Meanie                    There are two main types of domestic support obligations (‘DSO”) defined in the bankruptcy code. The first kind of DSO encompasses things such as child support payments and alimony. (To simplify, let’s just call this type: “support“). The second type of DSO comes from the distribution of property in divorce; in Pennsylvania the statutes refer to this as “equitable distribution“, which is the terminology I will use here. The latter usually consists of the spouse’s equitable share of the equity — as adjudicated by the courts or agreed to in a property settlement agreement, which also must be court approved in Pennsylvania — in the marital residence but can also include joint bank accounts and other valuable items.

In the general definitions within the Bankruptcy code 11 USC Sect.. 101(14 a-c), both support and equitable distribution appear as DSO’s, misleading one to think that perhaps the two will be treated identically in bankruptcy. However, while this is true of a Chapter 7, it is otherwise for a Chapter 13. The difference in treatment as between the two different kinds of domestic support obligations only become apparent when one looks at how they are treated those portions of the Bankruptcy Code dealing specifically with the discharge of these specific categories of debt.

At first glance in 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(5) and 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(15), the sections of the Code dealing with equitable distribution, it appears that these two subsets of domestic support obligations are treated the same. That is to say, neither support nor equitable distribution obligations appear to be discharged in bankruptcy, meaning specifically that in both a Chapter 7 bankruptcy these debts survive the bankruptcy and remain obligations of the debtor and alternately in a Chapter 13, they both must be paid in the plan and/or any amount left over so survives.

However, 11 USC Sect. 1328(a)(2) changes the picture radically, at least insofar as discharge after completion of a Chapter 13 Plan is concerned. (Note that virtually anyone who has a regular income can elect a Chapter 13 filing as versus a Chapter 7.) This provision essentially states that once all the plan payments are made and the debtor complies with its other requirements, the DSO types not listed in the statute will be discharged: one of the provisions so listed is 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(5), which again deals with with support debts. However, whether by design or inadvertence, Congress conspicuously excluded from that list 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(15), which again pertains to equitable distribution obligations.

Thus, unlike support, which cannot be discharged either in a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13, the proceeds of an equitable distribution can be discharged to the extent that the ex-spouse still owes same once the Chapter 13 plan payments have been otherwise completed. A clever bankruptcy lawyer, knowing this, will to the extent possible, draft a plan which, perhaps by favoring secured and other priority unsecured debt in order and amount of payment, provides for less than all of the equitable debt to be discharged, which has the effect of excusing the debtor spouse from his or her remaining equitable obligations, even though ironically these were awarded to the creditor spouse by a court of law. The (alas little appreciated) lesson for the family lawyer representing the creditor spouse is to require all equitable debt to be paid up before the property settlement agreement is authorized, so as to avoid eventual loss of some or all of their equity in a potential Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Others blogging on M include:

  • Bill Balena,      CLevand Bankruptcy lawyer tells us that M      is for Mistakes .
  • Omaha and Lincoln,      Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell says M is for Means Test.
  • Marin County      Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cate Eranthe blogs M is for Means Test, a popular topic.
  • New York Bankruptcy      Lawyer, Jay S. Fleischman agrees M is for Means Test too.
  • Colorado Springs bankruptcy      Attorney Bob Doig says M is for Meeting of Creditors.
  • Northern California      Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cathy Moran believes M is for Modify & also for Monthly Income.
  • Hawaii Bankruptcy      Lawyer, Stuart T. Ing says M is for Mortgage Arrears.

Picture credit: Bigbluemeanie

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

WHAT IS CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY?

Lucky Number 7 by ganesha.isisThe avowed goal of bankruptcy is to give debtors a “fresh start.” What is a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and how does it go about accomplishing this? The “automatic stay” in bankruptcy applies immediately once a Chapter 7 case is filed and generally halts all collection activities, foreclosures, repossessions, sheriffs’ sales, and etc. while in effect. Let’s first look at the different types of bankruptcy proceedings.

The United States Bankruptcy Code offers two primary paths for consumers:

  • A Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: In a so called “straight” bankruptcy, the Trustee in bankruptcy seeks to liquidate the debtor’s non exempt property and distribute the proceeds to the creditors in order of priority, in exchange for discharge of all eligible debt. (Exemptions for various property classifications are set out in federal and state law.) However, certain debts such as guaranteed student loans and domestic support obligations are non-dischargeable in bankruptcy. Most 7’s are “no asset” bankruptcies.

Certain higher income debtors who do not meet the new Means Test must instead file a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy. If you think you might be a candidate for a 13, you might wish to visit my article on the topic.

  • A Chapter 13 “debtor in possession” Bankruptcy: Here, unlike in Chapter 7 proceedings, the debtor retains possession of the assets (hence its nickname). In order to be confirmed by the court, the debtor must prove sufficient income to support a 3-5 year plan wherein payments on secured debt such as mortgages and auto loans (including arrears) and non-dischargeable items continue and unsecured creditors typically get paid a small portion of their debts. For debtors facing mortgage foreclosure, Chapter 13 may be the only choice to halt the process while seeking other remedies within or outside of bankruptcy. However, recent statistics indicate that only about 35% of all 13 plans are ever completed.

There are overall limits as to how much unsecured and/or secured debt a debtor may have and still utilize Chapter 7 or 13.  For those who do not qualify, there is only one option:

  • Chapter 11, a third type of Bankruptcy, is primarily used to help in debt businesses restructure. An example is the bankruptcy from which GM has successfully emerged with the help of a massive US bailout. It is much more complex, time consuming and expensive than Chapter 7 or 13, but is the sole resort for individual debtors with debt which exceeds the limits mentioned above.

Other than consumer perceptions that bankruptcy is somehow unethical or “wrong”, the primary issue with filing bankruptcy is that it remains on the debtor’s credit for up to 7 (Chapter 17) or 10 years (Chapter 13) from filing and may interfere with efforts to obtain credit, purchase or refinance a home or even obtain employment. However, it should be noted that most who seek this relief already have impaired credit and, more importantly, in reality new credit is generally extended to debtors who keep their payments current for a year or two following discharge. So, in effect bankruptcy can work to “repair” credit.

In summary, the automatic stay provides an effective if temporary refuge from foreclosure and other debt collection activities and many debtors ultimately do obtain the permanent solution to their debt problems, the “fresh start” which is the ultimate objective of the US bankruptcy laws.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Mod Services.

Photo by ganesha.isis

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CHAPTER 13 BANKRUPTCY

WHAT IS A CHAPTER 13 BANKRUPTCY?

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

13 by cappelmeister The avowed goal of bankruptcy is to give debtors a “fresh start.” What is a Chapter 13 bankruptcy and how does it go about accomplishing this? The “automatic stay” in bankruptcy applies immediately once a Chapter 13 case is filed and generally halts all collection activities, foreclosures, repossessions, sheriffs’ sales, and etc. while in effect. Let’s first look at the different types of bankruptcy proceedings.

The United States Bankruptcy Code offers two primary paths for consumers:

  • A Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: In a so called “straight” bankruptcy, the Trustee in bankruptcy seeks to liquidate the debtor’s non exempt property and distribute the proceeds to the creditors in order of priority, in exchange for discharge of all eligible debt. (Exemptions for various property classifications are set out in federal and state law.) However, certain debts such as guaranteed student loans and domestic support obligations are non-dischargeable in bankruptcy. Most 7’s are “no asset” bankruptcies.

Certain higher income debtors who do not meet the new Means Test must instead file a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

  • A Chapter 13 “debtor in possession” Bankruptcy: Here, unlike in Chapter 7 proceedings, the debtor retains possession of the assets (hence its nickname). In order to be confirmed by the court, the debtor must prove sufficient income to support a 3-5 year plan wherein payments on secured debt such as mortgages and auto loans (including arrears) and non-dischargeable items continue and unsecured creditors typically get paid a small portion of their debts. For debtors facing mortgage foreclosure, Chapter 13 may be the only choice to halt the process while seeking other remedies within or outside of bankruptcy. However, recent statistics indicate that only about 35% of all 13 plans are ever completed.

There are overall limits as to how much unsecured and/or secured debt a debtor may have and still utilize Chapter 7 or 13.

  • Chapter 11, a third type of Bankruptcy, is primarily used to help in debt businesses restructure. An example is the bankruptcy from which GM has successfully emerged with the help of a massive US bailout. It is much more complex, time consuming and expensive than Chapter 7 or 13, but is the sole resort for individual debtors with debt which exceeds the limits mentioned above.

Other than consumer perceptions that bankruptcy is somehow unethical or “wrong”, the primary issue with filing bankruptcy is that it remains on the debtor’s credit for up to 7 (Chapter 17) or 10 years (Chapter 13) from filing and may interfere with efforts to obtain credit, purchase or refinance a home or even obtain employment. However, it should be noted that most who seek this relief already have impaired credit and, more importantly, in reality new credit is generally extended to debtors who keep their payments current for a year or two following discharge. So, in effect bankruptcy can work to “repair” credit.

In summary, the automatic stay provides an effective if temporary refuge from foreclosure and other debt collection activities and many debtors ultimately do obtain the permanent solution to their debt problems, the “fresh start” which is the ultimate objective of the US bankruptcy laws.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

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N is for Negative Impact of Bankruptcy on Credit and How to Overcome it.

N by procsilas in Bankruptcy is for the Negative Impact of Bankruptcy on Credit and How to Overcome it.

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Most people are aware that filing bankruptcy can hurt their credit and it is well known that this can take its toll for up to ten years. But then why is it that the credit card apps start arriving again just a few weeks after a discharge in bankruptcy? Is it really true that a bankrupt is doomed to being deemed uncreditworthy for ten years? We will explore these questions below but first a bit of background.

The information contained within your credit report is generally governed by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. This federal law specifies how long a bankruptcy can appear on your credit report. This in turn varies based on type of bankruptcy as well as disposition of the case. Chapter 7 and 11 bankruptcies will appear on the report for up to 10 years from the filing date. Non-discharged or dismissed Chapter 13 and 12 bankruptcies also appear on a credit report for up to 10 years. Discharged Chapter 12 and 13 bankruptcies can remain on the report for up to seven years.

Does this mean that your credit will be impaired for 7 or 10 years? Does it mean you will not be able to purchase critical items on credit?    Certainly not, at least for the debtor who learns from past errors.

Note that the period starts running from the date of filing not discharge so, for example, if you filed a a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition 4 years ago and completed a 3 year plan 6 months ago, you only have three years to go. And during this time, you will, with persistence, be able to get credit for the things you really need (see below.)

You can begin to rebuild your credit rating immediately upon the date of your discharge order.  In a Chapter 7 this will be granted 3-4 months after your petition is filed, typically.   If you are in a Chapter 13 your plan payments will be reported even while still in bankruptcy.

Don’t even think about hiring a “Credit repair” agency. The money you might pay them can actually be used directly to repair your credit in the one way the experts agree really works.  The crucial thing you can do to rebuild your credit quickly and at no added cost is to pay all your bills on time. No exceptions.  It is not uncommon to see former clients who have rebuilt their ratings within 2 to 3 years after a bankruptcy. Their secret?  They paid their mortgage and car loans ON TIME and didn’t miss a payment. Some ideas: Send the checks EARLY in case the mail is delayed. Set up an emergency fund, perhaps in a short term CD, say with your tax refund to give yourself the “float” needed to make the payments in case you are short one month and then replenish it in flush months. Have the mental discipline to reserve it just for this purpose! If worse comes to worse, borrow against your IRA, 401K at work, life insurance policy  or pension.

As an example, a recent Chapter 7 client finished his case; obtained his discharge order and exactly 30 months later (2 years and 6 months), purchased a new home and obtained a competitive mortgage rate for a 30 year fixed mortgage.

You will be able to get a new credit card after your bankruptcy case has been completed.   It is true that you are likely to be rejected once or twice, but you should be able to obtain approval for a small credit card as long as you are persistent. Your best bet may be to talk to that friendly bank manager you have known for years. And you may need to ask more than once.

There are also ways to surrender that car you are driving now and its high rate loan and purchase a new car even while in bankruptcy, believe it or not.  You will pay a somewhat higher interest rate but rates are at historically low levels now anyway.

You will also be able to obtain student loans, for yourself or for a child, the Bankruptcy Code (11 U.S.C. Section 525) specifically prevents the government from discriminating against individuals on the grounds that they have filed for bankruptcy relief.  I have yet to hear of anyone being denied a student loan on bankruptcy grounds.

There are in addition certain “tricks of the trade” that a competent and compassionate bankruptcy attorney can impart to you once you have retained him or her which will speed up the process of restoring your credit even further.   Be sure to ask!

In conclusion, your payment history will be crucial after (and in a Chapter 13 even during) a bankruptcy discharge, because prospective lenders really will  be looking  to see that you have paid attention to the mandatory debtor counseling sessions and have well and truly learned the lesson of how to use credit responsibly. It often will be easier to rebuild credit after a bankruptcy discharge because you will no longer have debts that hopelessly exceed your credit limits.  In this way and in general (certainly, not in every individual case) over the long haul, the consumer bankruptcy laws prove their worth. This writ large then is why the “fresh start” offered to debtors by our system of bankruptcy is a necessity to a healthy capitalistic system.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality Chester County Bankruptcy Practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Carr, who has over 30 years if diversified experience as an attorney, concentrates his practice on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!


I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2011, 2012, All Rights Reserved.

Other Bankruptcy Lawyers writing on the letter N include:

California Northern Bankruptcy Court  Marin County Bankrupttcy Lawyer, Cate Eranthe http://marin-bankruptcy-law.com/803/bankruptcy-a-to-z-n-is-for-california-northern-bankruptcy-court/ NACBA Wisconsin Bankruptcy Lawyer, Bret Nason http://nasonlawfirm.com/archives/813 Naked New York Bankruptcy Lawyer, Jay S. Fleischman http://www.consumerhelpcentral.com/bankruptcy-alphabet-naked/ Negative Notice Jacksonville Bankruptcy Attorney J. Dinkins G. Grange http://jacksonville-bankruptcy-grange.blogspot.com/2012/02/n-is-for-negative-notice-local-rule.html Never Cleveland Bankruptcy Attorney William Balena http://ohiobankruptcysource.com/?p=2418 No Asset Metro Richmond Consumer and Bankruptcy Attorney, Mitchell Goldstein http://www.morethanbankruptcy.com/bankruptcy-a-z-n-is-for-no-asset-case.html No Asset Report Honolulu Bankruptcy Lawyer, Stuart T. Ing http://www.bankruptcyhi.com/2012/01/n-is-for-no-asset-report/ Non-exempt Property Miami Bankruptcy Attorney, Dorota Trzeciecka http://dorotatrzeciecka.com/2012/02/05/bankruptcy-a-z-n-is-for-non-exempt-property/ Nondischargeable Metro Richmond Consumer and Bankruptcy Attorney, Mitchell Goldstein http://www.morethanbankruptcy.com/bankruptcy-a-z-n-is-for-nondischargeable.html Nondischargeable Northern California Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cathy Moran http://www.bankruptcysoapbox.com/bankruptcy-alphabet-n-for-nondischargeable/ Nondischargeable Debt Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell http://bankruptcyblog.caldwell-lawfirm.com/2011/11/16/bankruptcy-alphabet-n-is-for-nondischargeable-debt.aspx Notice Colorado Springs Bankruptcy Attorney Bob Doig http://springsbankruptcylaw.com/?p=1227 Notice San Francisco Bankruptcy Attorney, Jeff Curl http://www.jclawgroup.com/blog/bankruptcy-alphabet-n-is-for-notice/ Notice Taylor, Michigan Bankruptcy Attorney, Chris McAvoy http://downriverbankruptcy.com/n-for-notice-creditors/#axzz1mtGwtQjh Notice of Rights to Claim Exemptions Charlotte Bankruptcy Attorneys, Collum & Perry http://www.collumperry.com/firm-news/notice-of-rights-to-claim-exemptions Numbers and New Bankruptcy Laws Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorney, Mark J. Markus http://www.bklaw.com/bankruptcy-blog/2012/03/numbers-and-new-bankruptcy-laws/ Non-Attorney Bankruptcy Livonia Michigan Bankruptcy Attorney, Peter Behrmann http://www.livoniamichiganbankruptcy.com/n-is-for-non-attorney-bankruptcy-livonia-michigan/

V is for “Victory”: FINDING & RESTORING CREDIT AFTER A BANKRUPTCY FILING

 V is for “VICTORY”:   FINDING & RESTORING CREDIT AFTER A BANKRUPTCY FILING

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

Why do so many of us come this way?  Well, virtually all of us who seek a bankruptcy do so in order to get a “fresh start”.  That is precisely what the law says it is there for.  Elsewhere, I argue that without such a safety net there to catch us if we fail, WE COULD NOT AND WOULD NOT HAVE A ROBUST FREE MARKET ECONOMY.  So many of us are maxxed out on our credit cards and have no more purchasing power.  We seek fresh sources of credit for autos, schooling, even our everyday purchases.  So for better or for worse, it becomes critical for us to find our way back to the credit wellspring as soon as possible after, nay even during, our bankruptcy.

A Chapter 7 “liquidation type” bankruptcy filing remains on your credit report for 10 years from the date of filing.   A Chapter 13 “debtor in possession” bankruptcy filing will remain on your credit report for 7 years from the date of filing. It will be automatically removed after the expiration of the applicable period.
Does this mean that your credit will be impaired for 7 to 10 years? Does it mean you will not be able to purchase critical items on credit?    Absolutely not.

Note that the period starts from the date of filing not discharge so, for example, if you are in a Chapter 13 and complete a 3 year plan 3.5 years later, you will only have three and a half to go. And during this time and even before, you will, with persistence, be able to get credit for the things you really need (see below.) But, you can begin to rebuild your credit rating immediately upon the date of your discharge order. (In a Chapter 7 this will be granted 3-4 months after your petition is filed, typically.)   Actually, it will often prove easier to rebuild your credit after a bankruptcy filing because you will no longer have debts that are in excess of your credit limits.

Don’t even think about hiring a “Credit repair” agency. The money you pay to them could actually be used directly to repair your credit.  As any bankruptcy practitioner will tell you, it’s really no secret, the crucial thing you need to do to rebuild your credit quickly and at no added cost is to pay all of your future bills on time. After a bankruptcy filing, your payment history will be crucial.  If you are in a Chapter 13 your plan payments will be reported. It is common to see former clients who have rebuilt their ratings within 2 to 3 years after a bankruptcy. Their secret? They paid their mortgage and car loans ON TIME and didn’t miss a payment. Some ideas: Send the checks EARLY in case the mail is delayed. Set up an emergency fund, perhaps in a short term CD, to give yourself the “float” needed to make the payments in case you are short one month and then replenish it in flush months or with your tax refund. Have the mental discipline not to use it for anything else!

As an example, a recent Chapter 7 client finished his case; obtained his discharge order and exactly 30 months later (2 years and 6 months), purchased a new home and obtained a competitive mortgage rate for a 30 year fixed.

You will be able to get a new credit card after your bankruptcy case has been completed.   It is true that you are likely to be rejected once or twice, but you should be able to obtain approval for a small credit card as long as you are persistent. Your best bet may be to talk to that friendly bank manager you have known for years. And you may need to ask more than once.

There are also ways to surrender that car you are driving now and its high rate loan and purchase a new car even while in bankruptcy, believe it or not.  You will pay a somewhat higher interest rate but rates are at historically low levels now anyway.

You will also be able to apply for student loans, for yourself or for a child.  Specifically, the Bankruptcy Code (11 U.S.C. Section 525) prevents the government from discriminating against individuals on the grounds that they have filed for bankruptcy relief.  I have yet to hear of anyone being denied a student loan on bankruptcy grounds.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, 2012, All Rights Reserved

“V” Photo by Janet McKnight

“U” IS FOR UNLISTED CREDITORS

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney. Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

U by StriaricNLISTED CREDITORS IN A “NO ASSET” CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY CASE

You filed your “no asset” chapter 7 bankruptcy and thought you obtained a discharge from all your past debts.  But you unintentionally omitted a trade creditor from your petition and that creditor has been calling daily demanding payment in full and threatening suit, claiming it was never notified of the bankruptcy.  You are wondering now whether you must pay the claim and if not what you can do to stop the calls and demands.

  • DO NOT PAY OR AGREE TO PAY THIS DEBT WITHOUT FIRST CONSULTING WITH LEGAL COUNSEL

Most jurisdictions have adopted a “no harm , no foul” rule , whereby  a debt will be discharged in the bankruptcy case, even if the debt is not listed in the bankruptcy and the creditor is not notified of the bankruptcy, if the following apply:

  1. The Court never set a deadline for creditors to file a proof of claim. This is the case in virtually all no asset cases.   In a no asset case the unlisted creditor is not harmed, because there was no distribution for the creditor to receive.  However, if the court did set a deadline for filing proofs of claim, then the obligation to the creditor is not discharged if the creditor was not listed in the bankruptcy and did not otherwise receive notice of the bankruptcy in time to file a proof of claim.  It is the setting of a deadline for the filing of a proof of claim that is the key.  Ironically, it does not matter whether the creditor would not have received any distribution from the trustee on the claim. Nor does it matter that no distribution was made by the trustee to any creditors. It is also irrelevant that a distribution was made by the trustee, but the omitted creditor would not have been paid anything even if a proof of claim had been timely filed, for example  if the distribution all went towards administrative costs and priority claims. In any of these instances, the debt survives the discharge.
  2. The creditor does not have the type of claim for which the creditor could have filed a lawsuit in the bankruptcy court to have the debt declared not discharged, such as for fraud or intentional injury.
  3. The creditor does not have the type of claim which is never discharged in bankruptcy, such as child support, spousal maintenance, most taxes, etc.
  • DEALING WITH THE OMITTED CREDITOR:

The biggest difficulty is often convincing an omitted creditor that its claim was discharged and that the post-discharge injunction of 11 USC §524 prohibits collection efforts. Typically, this will require the assistance of competent counsel.  At a minimum the creditor should be sent a legal letter advising of the law and the applicable court rulings in your jurisdiction.

The bankruptcy courts will not normally allow a closed case to be reopened for the purpose of listing an omitted creditor, since the matter  is considered moot,  butthe debtor may re-open the bankruptcy and request sanctions against a creditor that refused to stop collection efforts, in violation of 11 USC §524.   In addition, since the creditor is attempting to collect on an invalid debt, the harassment may also constitute one or more violations of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and/or applicable state consumer protection, especially if it continues after receipt of the lawyer’s letter.Again however, this is a matter you should bring up with your local counsel.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  


I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Other Attorneys Blogging on the Letter U Include:

U.S. Trustee Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell http://bankruptcyblog.caldwell-lawfirm.com/2011/11/23/bankruptcy-alphabet-u-is-for-u-s-trustee.aspx Unauthorized Practice of Law Cleveland Bankruptcy Attorney Bill Balena http://ohiobankruptcysource.com/?p=2601 Underwater Jay Fleischman, bankruptcy attorney in New York City http://www.consumerhelpcentral.com/bankruptcy-alphabet-underwater/ Underwater Metro Richmond Consumer and Bankruptcy Attorney, Mitchell Goldstein http://www.morethanbankruptcy.com/u-underwater.html United States Trustee Maui Bankruptcy Attorney, Stuart Ing http://www.bankruptcyhi.com/2012/02/u-is-for-the-united-states-trustee/ Unsecured Cathy Moran, Bay Area Bankruptcy Lawyer http://www.bankruptcysoapbox.com/bankruptcy-alphabet-2/ Upside-Down Vehicles Wisconsin Bankruptcy Lawyer, Bret Nason http://nasonlawfirm.com/archives/962 Unlisted Asset Allen Park, Michigan bankruptcy lawyer, Christopher McAvoy http://downriverbankruptcy.com/unlisted-undervalued-assets-bankruptcy/#axzz1uLBcDSOL Unsecured Creditor Livonia Bankruptcy Attorney, Peter Behrmann http://www.livoniamichiganbankruptcy.com/u-is-for-unsecured-creditor-in-bankruptcy/

 

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality Chester County Bankruptcy Practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Carr, who has over 30 years if diversified experience as an attorney, concentrates his practice on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!


©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2012, All Rights Reserved.  See Disclaimers.

Photo by Striatric

K is for “Knight in Shining Armor”

Knight1 form Pranavian

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney. Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

  It is simply AMAZING what a good bankruptcy lawyer can accomplish for you. In perhaps no other sector of the law are we attorneys handed a SWORD with which we can in a single blow, release the chains that bind our clients to the downward spiral of debt and a SHIELD with which to protect our clients against their predators (oops, I meant creditors).

Just look at what this mighty power we weild allows competent and compassionate counsel to do for you:

Eliminate Debt:

Credit Cards

Medical Bills

Liens and Judgments

Retain Assets:

Your Home

Retirement Accounts

Your Vehicles

Stop/Prevent:

Foreclosure/Repossession

Wage Garnishments

Creditor Harassment

Utility Shut Offs

Loss of Rental Unit

Reduce/Restructure/Strip Off:

Second & Beyond Mortgages

Late Model Vehicle Loans

& even retain for you or restore to you your very liberty, they even sometimes can keep you out of jail.

But BEWARE: of the novice, unskilled lawyer or the cut rate lawyer who “only does Chapter 7 bankruptcies”.  These types, through ignorance or lack of concern, will simply not be equipped to wield that sword and shield to fashion the relief that you need.  You need an EXPERIENCED FULL SERVICE CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY EXPERT to advise you and most importantly what your OPTIONS are and to help you to plan so that you can optimize your bankruptcy.

And where does this incredible power that we wield come from? Well, our forefathers, many of whom who had seen or even experienced firsthand the evils of the European debtor’s prisons, considered it a fundamental underlayment of the freedoms that we all enjoy that in times of need a “fresh start” could be obtained. So they instituted for all of the people of our great nation within the United States Constitution[1] the rights and protections of the bankruptcy clause!

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Other Attorneys Blogging on the Letter K Include: See Comments Below.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2012, All Rights Reserved.  See Disclaimers.


[1] Article 1, Section 8, Clause 4

T in the bankruptcy Alphabet is for the Missing Tax Refund

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

T 5309561982_8b35ba89ec_t[1] So you filed a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and then filed for a tax refund for the same year. YOUR REFUND NEVER ARRIVES. Surprise Surprise! The bankruptcy trustee had it directed to him. A trustee’s primarily job is to represent your unsecured creditors and he/she can submit a request for your federal tax refund on behalf of the bankruptcy estate and distribute the funds to them.

Think about it, when you file for bankruptcy what is the no. 1 thing the trustee is interested in?  Your INCOME of course. And what is a tax refund really but INCOME that you let Uncle Sam hold for you (interest free). The trustee under most circumstances is entitled to it.

Could this have been avoided? The answer is most certainly “yes” with a little planning. Unless an emergency bankruptcy has to be filed to save a home from Sheriff’s sale or a car from repossession, most clients have a good deal of time between the time they come in to meet with me for the first time and filing. A good bankruptcy lawyer will examine your most recent tax return to see if your refund is too high. If so, I will advise you to immediately reduce your payroll tax deduction (by increasing your exemptions on your W-4 withholding form which you have the right to do at any time.) This will put money in your pocket NOW and you can likely show a tax refund small enough so that your trustee will not even bother with it.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Other Attorneys Blogging on the Letter T  Include: .

  1. Omaha and      Lincoln, Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell T is for Transfers.
  2. Bankruptcy      Lawyer Jay S. Fleischman T is for Trustee.
  3. Kauai      Bankruptcy Attorney, Stuart T. Ing T is for Taxes.
  4. San Mateo      County Bankruptcy Lawyer Cathy Moran T is for Tension.
  5. Metro      Richmond Consumer and Bankruptcy Attorney Mitchell Goldstein T is for Thirteen.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2012, All Rights Reserved. See Disclaimers.

Photo by Jetheriot