Gamblers & Bankruptcy

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By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Why do some people already in dire economic shape gamble?  Prudence suggests that they should not do so but gamblers are notoriously imprudent. Well ironically they often do so because they foolishly believe that they can gamble their way out of debt.  Other gamblers think they can win enough money to pay back their gambling debts– debts they may have rung up on their credit cards, money owed to casinos or riverboats, loan debt, and even home equity debt all associated with gambling problems–but quite the opposite happens. You only end up creating more gambling debt to repay. And even if you actually did win enough money to pay off your debt, you would most likely gamble that money away too, thinking if you won once you could win again. GA and other organizations can help to cure the addiction but the debt that persists is a slippery slope tempting the gambler to return to the game of choice and chance.  So oftentimes it is necessary to cure the debt problem to alleviate the addiction. And there is only one way to effectively do so, a Chapter 7 (or 13) bankruptcy, which if successful can wipe the slate clean in one fell swoop.  Thus, Bankruptcy may be the only option for dealing with gambling debt.

If you owe bookies or loan sharks, you may be forced to borrow money from a friend or family member to pay the gambling debt, especially if you’re being threatened with reprisals if you do not pay up . But borrowing money from a loved one, while perhaps better than having your legs broken, may not be such a good idea because all such debts will be discharged in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy leaving them high and dry.

I tell such clients that they should pay some of the money they are gambling away to me instead.  Gambling is risky and the “odds are stacked in favor of the house” but I am a sure thing, or nearly so.  What stands in the way of a fresh start in Bankruptcy for the gambler?

  1. Fraud: Gambling debt, including debt incurred from casinos or charged on credit cards and loans, can be discharged in bankruptcy. It’s important to know that any creditor can object to the bankruptcy filing by claiming you incurred the debt under false pretenses or through fraud. For example, if you took out a credit card cash advance knowing you didn’t have the money to repay the advance when you borrowed it, the creditor can ask the court not to discharge the debt. Creditors owed gambling debts may file “adversary proceedings” to challenge the dischargeability of their debts under Bankruptcy Code section 523(a)(2)(A) provides an exception to discharge for debts obtained by “false pretenses, a false representation, or actual fraud.”  These suits, historically filed by casinos, are rare today. They are expensive, cast the casino and its entire industry in a bad light and with the rise of legalized gambling, are no longer favored by the courts.  The gambler’s creditor has the burden to prove that the gambler actually committed fraud, in other words that you had the intent not to repay the debt when incurred and that is barring some lucky (or more likely stupid) admission, very difficult to do.
  2. Reporting Requirement: All gambling losses within the previous year must be reported on the Statement of Financial Affairs which is part of every bankruptcy filing.  This is required so the bankruptcy trustee and court can determine whether any fraud was involved in the bankruptcy filing.  Bankruptcy trustees have broad powers to avoid transfers which appear fraudulent because they are transfers for which the debtor received “less than reasonably equivalent value,” which is the basic benchmark for determining fraud under the Bankruptcy Code. This requirement may pose obvious difficulty for the gambler who has been dealing with loan sharks who may act aggressively to keep from having their names become a matter of public record.
  3. Luxury Debts: However unlikely it is that the casino will win an adversary action, there is another bar standing in the way of clearing very recent gambling debt. Bankruptcy Code section 523(a)(2)(C) makes a debt non-dischargeable if the debts was for a “luxury good or service” over $1,225 and purchased within 60 days of the filing of the bankruptcy.  That section also precludes discharge of cash advances over $1,225 obtained within 60 days of the filing of the bankruptcy.  In most cases, the exception can be avoided by simply waiting the requisite 60 day period of time
    to file the bankruptcy.  However, this may not be as easy as it sounds for the compulsive gambler. Often the lawyer must demand a turnover of all credit cards, etc. so that the problem is cut off at the source.
  4. Chapter 13: Impossibility of fulfilling the plan because of compulsive gambling:  oftentimes a gambler who is behind in house or car payments because of money diverted to gambling will have no choice but to file a Chapter 13.  This requires a 3-5 year plan wherein the gambler promises to repay some of his debts.  But the plan must be funded by the gambler’s income and little threatens income as effectively as compulsive gambling.  Thus, may trustees and courts (tipped off by the required gambling disclosures…see above) will closely scrutinize such a plan and may demand that the gambler be under the treatment of a psychiatrist and/or regularly attending GA meetings before they will give it the go ahead. A clean recent bank and/or credit card statement(s), not showing large withdrawals, can also be very helpful in showing that the gambler has the self control needed to suceed with a plan in a Chapter 13.

It is clear that the cure of the gambling addiction and its economic fallout go hand in hand.  One cannot easily be repaired without the other. We are experienced in dealing with the problems of and in counseling gamblers and would be happy to discuss the issues facing you or a loved one challenged by this affliction.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified legal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  


Now that you Have Your Bankruptcy Discharge: 10 (actually 11) Things to Do to Make the most of it!

 

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

So You Finally Got that Bankruptcy Discharge
Congratulations!
You’re on your way to a fresh start.
Now you’ve got more to do? See why below:
1. Check debts that didn’t get discharged: Child or spousal support, student loans, or taxes for years for which you did not file a return (unless the IRS exceptions are met) are not dischargeable in bankruptcy. The discharge order will not tell you which debts survive and which do not, nor will the Court provide this information so you may continue to require the services of a knowledgeable bankruptcy lawyer to help you to assess this.
2. Verify lien balances: The discharge eliminates your personal liability for dischargeable debts; liens survive. If you plan to keep a house or car encumbered with liens, find out what you owe and resume payments. Otherwise, the creditor can enforce its lien by foreclosure or repossession.
3. Reset Banking Priveleges: Online banking and automatic bill pay may have been disabled while you were in bankruptcy but can be restarted at your request now..
4. Do Some Record Keeping: Save your bankruptcy papers and keep a copy of your discharge paper handy: You’re likely to encounter efforts by buyers of to collect debts that have been discharged in your case, or so called “zombie debt”. You need to be able to show that the debt was discharged in your case. Creditors with notice of the bankruptcy, and likewise those who buy up their worthless accounts and try to collect on them, were discharged (unless they fall within Rule #1 above). The services of a knowledgeable bankruptcy lawyer may be necessary to stop these collectors, or even under some circumstances to sue them for unfair practices and potentially turn the tables by collecting from them, including your legal fees.
6. Join a credit union: Credit unions are owned by their members. They are in the business of extending credit to members (hence the name, “Credit Union’: “Credit” stands for what they do and “Union” for the members they lend to) and the profits from such loans flow to members. Rates are almost always lower and terms better than the commercial banks, savings and loans and private lenders. Start out with a savings or checking account. Sooner or later you will probably need a car loan or even a home loan. Joining now will give you the longevity that adds credibility to a credit union.
7. Maintain insurance coverage: Even though you may have elected to surrender property through the bankruptcy that still stands in your name, make sure that you are insured for liability. Liability insurance covers you for claims of anyone injured on your property. Electing to surrender property doesn’t take you off title until someone else goes on title. Post bankruptcy claims arising from property you’re trying to offload can potentially ruin the fresh start.
8. Get a credit report: Several months after your discharge, check your credit report to make sure all discharged debts reflect a zero balance. The bankruptcy history can properly remain on your credit for up to 10 years, but you are entitled to a showing that you now owe nothing on all discharged accounts (but see Factor #1 above) This is crucial because your debt to income ratio (“DTI”),one of the primary if not THE primary factor lenders look to in extending credit. Getting erroneous entries corrected may be facilitated using the services of a knowledgeable bankruptcy lawyer. You are entitled to a truly free credit report annually from each of the 3 major credit bureaus which you can get by clicking here and credit experts recommend that you check it at least once a year.
9. Budget and Learn to Spend Within Your Means: Studies have shown that people who go bankrupt only do so ONCE in their lives. WHY? Well debt relief is only one side of the coin. On the flip side are the lessons people take from bankruptcy. So, like these now money wise people, take advantage of the fresh start that bankruptcy has provided, and make lifestyle changes so that it does not happen again. Follow Rule # 10 below and stop using trade credit (AKA: Credit Cards). Get a debit card instead and be you own bank, there is no interest that way!
10. Use credit Wisely. Once Lenders see that you have received a discharge, they may well start sending you “preauthorized” credit card applications. However, if you start to load up on credit again, you will soon be right back where you started. So the rule of thumb is to have just one credit card that you keep in a drawer somewhere for emergencies; If you do use it, make it “free credit”, that is: plan to pay it all back in the same month as incurred so that you are not left carrying a balance ant interest. That way you are living within your means. See Rule # 9 above. The only other credit to use generally speaking is for major purchases such as car or home loans.
11. Build up a reserve for emergencies and start saving again. Set up automatic savings Bankruptcy probably brought home to you how little net worth you have and how thin the safety net is. Arrange for automatic savings for both an emergency fund and for retirement.
Since you no longer have trade credit, it will be easier to devote some of your income to savings…follow the rule “Pay yourself first”. Experts recommend a reserve of 6 months salary and at least a 10% savings rate. Contributions toward your IRA or 401K at work count as you can withdraw these funds (with penalty if applicable) in an emergency.
If you follow these rules, you are more likely to take full advantage of your fresh start and not ever be back to see your friendly local bankruptcy lawyer!

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

M is for Matrimonial Property Obligations and the Discharge in Bankruptcy

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

    M by BigBlue Meanie                    There are two main types of domestic support obligations (‘DSO”) defined in the bankruptcy code. The first kind of DSO encompasses things such as child support payments and alimony. (To simplify, let’s just call this type: “support“). The second type of DSO comes from the distribution of property in divorce; in Pennsylvania the statutes refer to this as “equitable distribution“, which is the terminology I will use here. The latter usually consists of the spouse’s equitable share of the equity — as adjudicated by the courts or agreed to in a property settlement agreement, which also must be court approved in Pennsylvania — in the marital residence but can also include joint bank accounts and other valuable items.

In the general definitions within the Bankruptcy code 11 USC Sect.. 101(14 a-c), both support and equitable distribution appear as DSO’s, misleading one to think that perhaps the two will be treated identically in bankruptcy. However, while this is true of a Chapter 7, it is otherwise for a Chapter 13. The difference in treatment as between the two different kinds of domestic support obligations only become apparent when one looks at how they are treated those portions of the Bankruptcy Code dealing specifically with the discharge of these specific categories of debt.

At first glance in 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(5) and 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(15), the sections of the Code dealing with equitable distribution, it appears that these two subsets of domestic support obligations are treated the same. That is to say, neither support nor equitable distribution obligations appear to be discharged in bankruptcy, meaning specifically that in both a Chapter 7 bankruptcy these debts survive the bankruptcy and remain obligations of the debtor and alternately in a Chapter 13, they both must be paid in the plan and/or any amount left over so survives.

However, 11 USC Sect. 1328(a)(2) changes the picture radically, at least insofar as discharge after completion of a Chapter 13 Plan is concerned. (Note that virtually anyone who has a regular income can elect a Chapter 13 filing as versus a Chapter 7.) This provision essentially states that once all the plan payments are made and the debtor complies with its other requirements, the DSO types not listed in the statute will be discharged: one of the provisions so listed is 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(5), which again deals with with support debts. However, whether by design or inadvertence, Congress conspicuously excluded from that list 11 USC Sect. 523(a)(15), which again pertains to equitable distribution obligations.

Thus, unlike support, which cannot be discharged either in a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13, the proceeds of an equitable distribution can be discharged to the extent that the ex-spouse still owes same once the Chapter 13 plan payments have been otherwise completed. A clever bankruptcy lawyer, knowing this, will to the extent possible, draft a plan which, perhaps by favoring secured and other priority unsecured debt in order and amount of payment, provides for less than all of the equitable debt to be discharged, which has the effect of excusing the debtor spouse from his or her remaining equitable obligations, even though ironically these were awarded to the creditor spouse by a court of law. The (alas little appreciated) lesson for the family lawyer representing the creditor spouse is to require all equitable debt to be paid up before the property settlement agreement is authorized, so as to avoid eventual loss of some or all of their equity in a potential Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

Others blogging on M include:

  • Bill Balena,      CLevand Bankruptcy lawyer tells us that M      is for Mistakes .
  • Omaha and Lincoln,      Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell says M is for Means Test.
  • Marin County      Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cate Eranthe blogs M is for Means Test, a popular topic.
  • New York Bankruptcy      Lawyer, Jay S. Fleischman agrees M is for Means Test too.
  • Colorado Springs bankruptcy      Attorney Bob Doig says M is for Meeting of Creditors.
  • Northern California      Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cathy Moran believes M is for Modify & also for Monthly Income.
  • Hawaii Bankruptcy      Lawyer, Stuart T. Ing says M is for Mortgage Arrears.

Picture credit: Bigbluemeanie

The “F” in Bankruptcy Alphabet is for “Failure” (and “Fresh Starts” in Bankruptcy)

F 2724770810_f84d80d958_t[1] is for Failure and “Fresh Starts” in Bankruptcy {Perhaps also for “Favorite”  because of all the articles I have written, this is my favorite”}

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq. Chester County bankruptcy attorney.

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: westchesterbankruptcyattorney.org

Many people in our culture still believe unfortunately that it is a mortal “sin” to declare bankruptcy; akin to a financial death sentence, to admitting failure as a human being and as a member of the larger economic enterprise. But in fact bankruptcy has been “built into” the US capitalist system since its beginnings with the Bill of Rights because it is essential to the very success of that model, which is in turn based on encouraging individual risk taking.

Being a success is a basic assumption of American life. We are taught almost from birth that at all costs we must be winner! But In fact, it is a harsh irony of life that success is built on trial and error and consequently upon failure. Some companies have even adopted corporate cultures which actually encourage failure so that employees will be willing to take risks and innovate.  See Why I Hire People Who Fail.

Our lawmakers from the very founding of our country have been mindful of the necessity to provide this “escape path for risk takers”:

The United States Constitution provides a method whereby individuals, burdened by excessive debt, can obtain a fresh financial start and pursue newly productive lives unimpaired by past financial problems. It is an important alternative for persons mired deep in financial difficulty.

The federal bankruptcy laws were enacted to provide debtors with a fresh start and to establish a ranking and equity among all the creditors who are clamoring for the debtor’s limited resources. Bankruptcy helps people avoid the kind of permanent discouragement that can prevent them from ever reestablishing themselves as hard-working members of society.

Source: Purposes, Benefits and Costs of Bankruptcy Disclosure pursuant to U.S. Code § 527(a)(1) & § 342(b)(1).

Some disagree with this proposition stating based on empirical findings that bankruptcy only helps about 2/3 of all who apply to get a fresh start and that is only because they find a steady income source.  See “The Failure of Bankruptcy’s Fresh Start”.  But for me, this only proves the point for i.) 2/3 is a pretty high rate of economic “resussitation”, ii) a study design like this just looks at a single point in time, it does not do follow ups to see what percentage ultimately do see improvement in their financial condition and iii.) how do you get people to pull themselves out of the economic mire (see quote above) unless society provides a safety net which is after all what bankruptcy really is? Not everyone will try and of those who do not all will make it but then there are no guarantees in life (or the law).

In my practice I represent many hard working small business people (from screenplay writers to truck stop owners) who are heavily engaged in the capitalist system. And what is capitalism at its core but the willingness of people to take chances in hopes of making money?  Someone–a small business venture–comes up with an idea for a business, obtains the financing and other myriad necessary resources to get that business up and running, strives to generate sufficient revenues to cover expenses over time, all in the hopes of making a profit from engaging in the business. At any point things may not work out as expected, causing the business to founder and ultimately sink.  Failure lurks in waiting at every corner!

Indeed some historians of note have argued that the American Revolution was in large part fought for debt relief:

The idea that debt is necessary for trade, and is to be forgiven liberally when necessary, is a key driver to the rise of our market economy. Americans fought to provide the same debt relief to everyone because we believe in equality and because bankruptcy protection takes the risk out of risk taking. Our historic willingness as a nation to forgive debt lies behind a good part of our prosperity. One good example is John Pintard, a state legislator and stockbroker, who was one of those who fell for William Duer’s financial scheme, which helped trigger the Panic of 1792, the nation’s first stock-market crash. Pintard ultimately landed in debtors’ prison in Newark. He got out of jail in 1798, and he filed for bankruptcy in New York in 1800. Among his many other post bankruptcy accomplismments, Pintard  founded the New-York Historical Society in 1804, and was a founder of the New York Bank for Savings in 1819.

In 1841, Congress passed a sweeping federal bankruptcy law that offered bankruptcy to everyone. Meanwhile, in 1831, the New York State Legislature abolished imprisonment for debt. Other states soon followed. Debtors’ prison was abolished, and bankruptcy law was liberalized, because Americans came to see that most people who fall into debt are victims of the economic cycle or misfortune like Pintard, and not of sloth, greed, or other negative personal attributes.

What would happen if there were no bankruptcy laws, no bankruptcy courts and no chance for people to obtain a fresh start?  Would people be as eager to innovate, to take chances and to possibly fail with no safety net to catch them? It is a fundamental premise of the capitalist system that they would not. That is why people who cannot pay their debts should not feel that they are ethically “challenged”, especially in this difficult economy, if they find they must seek the protection from their creditors for which our bankruptcy laws so prudently provide. For, failure is only the first step on the way to a fresh start!

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2011, 2012, All Rights Reserved.

More attorneys playing the bankruptcy alphabet game at letter F (HEY GUYS WE ARE 25% OF THE WAY TO Z!!!):

Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell: F is for Family Farmer/Fisherman.

New York Bankruptcy Lawyer, Jay S. Fleischman: F is for Future Flow Agreement .

Northern California Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cathy Moran: F is for First .

Kauai Bankruptcy Attorney, Stuart Ing: F is for Foreclosure

Jacksonville, Florida Bankruptcy Attorney, J. Dinkins G. Grange: F is for Forms .

Colorado Springs Bankruptcy Attorney Bob Doig: F is for Foreclosure .

Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorney, Mark J. Markus: F is for Forgiveness of Debt .

“B” in the Bankruptcy Alphabet is for “Business Bankruptcy” for Individuals Trying to Trying to Retain a Valuable Car

 in the Bankruptcy Alphabet is for “Business Bankruptcy” for Individuals

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq., Chester County Bankruptcy Lawyer

The US Supreme Court has held that individual debtors may file under the provisions of Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code.  This can be very valuable for persons owning high value cars in certain circumstances.

In contrast to a typical consumer bankruptcy under Chapter 7 or 13 however, Chapter 11 is generally designed for business reorganization bankruptcies. Chapter 11 cases tend to be complicated, as well as confusing and expensive for the debtor and the rules are generally less appropriate and less favorable for the consumer.  For example, unlike a Chapter 13 case, a Chapter 11 case may not be dismissed or converted to a Chapter 7 case as a matter of right by the debtor and creditors must generally vote on the plan.

It is advisable for a careful review to be performed by a bankruptcy attorney to ensure that a Chapter 11 is necessary as in the vast majority of cases a Chapter 11 will not be the correct choice for an individual.

But there is at least one very important circumstance under which an individual might choose an 11, one which may actually be very advantageous in the case of high cost rapidly depreciating automobiles.  A debtor who seeks to cram down (reduce the debt to the present day fair market value of the collateral) a lien on an automobile will be limited by the 910 day rule. If the vehicle was purchased less than 910 days before filing the bankruptcy petition then the debtor cannot cram down the lien in a Chapter 13 plan. However, under Chapter 11, no such time requirement exists. Hence if the vehicle is worth less than the loan a motion to determine secured status may be in order. The bankruptcy court can then value the vehicle and the debtor can pay off the vehicle in the Chapter 11 plan.  But unless the vehicle was  highly valuable when purchased the high cost even of a typical Chapter 13 case will outweigh the benefit of the cram down.

Let’s take a look at the economics from the client’s point of view. The minimum cost to the client of a simple Chapter 11 is $10,000 plus $1,039 filing fee as compared to approximately $3,000-3,500 for a 13 plus $274 filing fee.  It is well known that that most luxury automobiles lose approximately 15% per year in the early years of ownership (when the 910 day rule would prohibit a cram down in a 13) whereas the debtor may have paid only interest and no principal so far on the auto loan. At the 2 year mark a luxury car that sold for $80,000 might now be worth $66,000 but the debtor might still owe close to $80,000 assuming payments are up to date.  Under this example, all else being equal, the debtor might well want to elect to do a Chapter 11 so as to be able to cram the car down to its blue book value and save a maximum $16,700 after net fees and costs are deducted.  But now let’s say that the same hypothetical debtor owned a less prestigious vehicle with a purchase price of say $20,000.  If after 2 years of ownership, if it could be crammed down to $14,000, the net cost of a Chapter 11 would be greater than the $6,000 savings generated. This individual, if possible under the circumstances, might want to wait out the full 910 days and declare a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. There are additional factors which may favor a Chapter 11 which are beyond the scope of this article. Again, a thorough review of the matter is strongly advised however.

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

Other attorneys playing the bankruptcy alphabet game (more “B” topics from consumer lawyers around the country):

Bad Faith Filing    Miami Bankruptcy Attorney, Dorota Trzeciecka

Bank Account    New York Bankruptcy Lawyer, Jay S. Fleischman

Bank Account   Daniel J. Winter, Chicago Bankruptcy Attorney

Bank Account Levy   Philadelphia Bankruptcy Lawyer, Raymond Kempinski

Bank Tips    Wisconsin Bankruptcy Lawyer, Bret Nason

Bankruptcy     Taylor Michigan Bankruptcy Lawyer, Christopher McAvoy

Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act Livonia Michigan Bankruptcy Attorney, Peter Behrmann

Bankruptcy Estate  Metro Richmond Consumer and Bankruptcy Attorney, Mitchell Goldstein

Bankruptcy Mill   Chicago Bankruptcy Attorney, Kyle A. Lindsey

Bankruptcy Petition Preparers    Colorado Springs Bankruptcy Attorney Bob Doig

Bankruptcy Petition Preparers    Los Angeles Bankruptcy Law Monitor, Christine Wilton

Bankruptcy Timeline    Pittsburgh Bankruptcy Attorney Shawn N. Wright

Bar Date    Ormond Beach Bankruptcy Attorney, Lewis Roberts

Benefits of Chapter 13    Vermont-New Hampshire Bankruptcy Lawyer, Michelle Kainen

Best Efforts Test    St. Louis, Missouri Bankruptcy Attorney, Nancy Martin

Best Interest of Creditors    Honolulu Bankruptcy Attorney, Stuart Ing

Beware of these Credit Card Offers    Marin County Bankruptcy and Consumer Attorney, Catherine Eranthe Bifurcate    Tuscaloosa and Birmingham Bankruptcy Lawyer, Melinda Murphy Dionne

Borrow    San Francisco Bankruptcy Attorney, Jeena Cho

Budget    Columbus, Ohio Bankruptcy Attorney, Athena Inemboildis

Budget     Birmingham Bankruptcy Attorney, Elizabeth Johnson

Budget     Charlotte Bankruptcy Attorneys, Collum & Perry

Business    Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska Bankruptcy Attorney, Ryan D. Caldwell

Business   Northern California Bankruptcy Lawyer, Cathy Moran

Business & Individuals    Philadelphia Suburban Bankruptcy Lawyer, Chris Carr

Business bankruptcy    Los Angeles Bankruptcy Blog, Mark J. Markus

Businesses and Business Debt   Newnan Georgia Bankruptcy Lawyer, Rick Palmer

Buy Low and Sell High   Cleveland Area Bankruptcy Lawyer, Bill Balena

Bad Credit    Houston Bankruptcy Attorneys, Busby & Associates

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2011, All Rights Reserved

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality Chester County Bankruptcy Practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Carr, who has over 30 years if diversified experience as an attorney, concentrates his practice on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!

I also provide Mortgage Modification Services.

I also provide Debt Settlement; IRS Tax Settlement & Mortgage Mod Services NATIONALLY.

The “A” in Bankruptcy Alphabet is for “Alimony”

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq., Chester County Bankruptcy Lawyer

One of the most disturbing changes in the Bankruptcy Code* enacted by Congress in 2005 for persons getting divorces and contracting marital debts is Section 523 (a)  which states in effect that an alimony, support or maintenance  obligation to an ex-spouse cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, but must be paid in full, with two limited exceptions:

  1. If a divorce decree specifies that an obligation to a spouse is alimony, but the obligation is not actually in the nature of alimony, then the obligation can be discharged in bankruptcy.

For example, Joe Dentist and Mary Dentist enter into a divorce decree which states that Joe Dentist is to pay a marital debt to The Joe Dentist and Mary Dentist Professional Corporation, where both practice dentistry, and further specifies that the husband’s payment of the debt shall be treated as alimony.  Joe Dentist may nonetheless be able to have this debt discharged in bankruptcy even though the divorce decree indicates that the payment of the debt is “alimony”, because such payments can be characterized as a capital contribution to the Professional Corporation and not as alimony.

2. Also, an ex-spouse may be able to discharge an alimony obligation if it has been assigned to a third party.

For example, suppose John and Mary Jones divorce. John Jones is ordered to pay Mary Jones alimony of $1,500.00 per month. John does not pay the alimony and Mary, who needs the money, assigns the right to collect alimony to her brother, Crusher Jones, who owns a profitable Junk Yard and feels the urge to pummel John. Crusher now gives Mary the $1,500.00 each and every month. Crusher now owns the right to collect the alimony from John. But John can escape the debt (if not the pummeling).  The alimony obligation can be discharged under Section 523 since it has been voluntarily assigned by Mary.

*The United States Bankruptcy Code (Title 11 of the United States Code) states in Section 523 that:

(a) A discharge under Section 727, 1141, 1228(a), 1228(b), or 1328(b) of this title does not discharge an individual debtor from any debt . . . (5) to a spouse, former spouse, or child of the debtor, for alimony to, maintenance for, or support of such spouse or child, in connection with a separation agreement, divorce decree or other order of a court of record, determination made in accordance with State or territorial law by a governmental unit, or property settlement agreement, but not to the extent that (A) such debt is assigned to another entity, voluntarily, by operation of law, or otherwise (other than debts assigned pursuant to § 402(a)(26) of the Social Security Act, or any such debt which has been assigned to the Federal Government or to a State or any political subdivision of such State); or

(B) such debt includes a liability designation as alimony, maintenance, or support, unless such liability is actually in the nature of alimony, maintenance or support . . . .

(enphasis added).

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality bankruptcy and debt relief practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Christopher Carr, a Chester County bankruptcy attorney, who has over 30 years if diversified ;egal experience, concentrates on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!  

I also provide Mortgage Mod Services .

©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law, 2011, All Rights Reserved

For other articles on the letter A in the bankruptcy alphabet series, click here.

Other attorneys playing their “Bankruptcy A Game” include:

A is for Contract Assumption

A is for Adversary Proceeding

A is for Assets

A is for Assets

A is for Assumption

A is for Assumptions

A is for Attorney

A is for Automatic Stay

A is for Automatic Stay

A is for Automobiles

A is for Avoidance of Preferential Transfers  

A is for Avoidance

Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., is a quality Chester County Bankruptcy Practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Carr, who has over 30 years if diversified experience as an attorney, concentrates his practice on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester County and Eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Sadsbury, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown & West Chester,  Pennsylvania. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!

I also provide Debt Settlement; IRS Tax Settlement & Mortgage Mod Services NATIONALLY.

Photo Credit: Too Far North

Filing Bankruptcy: Pros and Cons

 

Christopher C Carr, Bankruptcy Guest Contributor

By Christopher C. Carr, Esq., Chester County Bankruptcy Lawyer

Tel: 610-380-7969 Email: cccarresq@aol.com Web: carrlaw.org

NACBA 1f18af63-1ee5-4ce2-8294-7eae8365f678

 

Christopher C. Carr , Esq., MBA explains the types of bankruptcy and weighs the pros and cons of filing bankruptcy.

In these troubled economic times many people are having difficulties paying their bills and may be wondering whether a bankruptcy will help them. To examine the various strategies available to avoid bankruptcy, we must first understand what bankruptcy is and what it can and cannot do. The United States Bankruptcy Code offers several types of debt relief. The United States Bankruptcy Code offers two primary paths for consumers:

  • A Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: In a so called “straight” bankruptcy, the Trustee in bankruptcy seeks to liquidate the debtor’s non exempt property and distribute the proceeds to the creditors in order of priority, in exchange for discharge of all of the debtor’s eligible debt. (Exemptions for various property classifications are set out in federal and state law.) However, certain debts such as guaranteed student loans and domestic support obligations are non-dischargeable in bankruptcy. Most 7’s are “no asset” bankruptcies.

Certain higher income debtors who do not meet the new Means Test must instead file a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

  • A Chapter 13 “debtor in possession” Bankruptcy: Here, unlike in Chapter 7 proceedings, the debtor retains possession of the assets (hence its nickname). In order to be confirmed by the court, the debtor must prove sufficient income to support a 3-5 year plan wherein payments on secured debt such as mortgages and auto loans (including arrears) and non-dischargeable items continue and unsecured creditors typically get paid a small portion of their debts. For debtors facing mortgage foreclosure, Chapter 13 may be the only choice to halt the process while seeking other remedies within or outside of bankruptcy such as a Home Affordable mortgage modification is obtained. However, recent statistics indicate that only about 35% of all 13 plans are ever completed.

There are overall limits as to how much unsecured and/or secured debt a debtor may have and still utilize Chapter 7 or 13. If either is exceeded then the debtor will have but one alternative if they wish to file for bankruptcy:

  • Chapter 11, a third type of Bankruptcy, is primarily used to help in debt businesses restructure. An example is the bankruptcy from which GM has successfully emerged with the help of a massive US bailout. It is much more complex, time consuming and expensive than Chapter 7 or 13, but is the sole resort for individual debtors with debt which exceeds the limits mentioned above.

Other Advantages to Bankruptcy: The overall goal of every bankruptcy case is to give the debtor a “fresh start.” The “automatic stay” in bankruptcy will apply once your case is filed. This generally halts all collection activities, foreclosures, repossessions, Sherriff’s sales, etc. while in effect.

Disadvantages to Bankruptcy:

  • Many people wish to avoid bankruptcy because of the social stigma perceived to be associated with “going bankrupt” even though it is perfectly legal and in fact is guaranteed by the US Constitution.
  • Bankruptcy remains on the debtor’s credit for up to 7 (Chapter 17) or 10 years (Chapter 13) from filing and may interfere with efforts to obtain credit, purchase or refinance a home or even obtain employment. However, it should be noted that most who seek this relief already have impaired credit and, more importantly, in reality new credit is generally extended to debtors who keep their payments current for a year or two following discharge. So, in effect bankruptcy can work to “repair” credit where nothing else can.

A real life example would be where the debtor has amassed so much debt that they cannot qualify for a mortgage.  Their debt to income ratio is just too high. At tins point there is little reason to hold off from filing as the likelihood of obtaining credit resources at competitive rates are almost nil. However, once the debt is cleared by a discharge in bankruptcy this ratio can return to normal or better and given sufficient time and a good post petition payment profile, the debtor will once again be an attractive loan candidate.

Homeowners, who have racked up large arrears in their mortgage payments which have to be repaid in full over the 3-5 year plan period in a chapter 13 , may find the payments too high to afford causing the bankruptcy ultimately to be discharged or converted, perhaps thus only delaying the ultimate loss of their home in contrast to a Home Affordable (HAMP) mortgage modification where as the name implies ideally a long term affordable solution is reached.

  • Not all types of debt are dischargable in bankruptcy, a good example being guaranteed student loans.
  • While perhaps not strictly speaking a disadvantage,  there is a substantial waiting period once a bankruptcy has been discharged…the debtor has to wait to file if they wish to again obtain a discharge from new debt, the timeframes varying with the type of bankruptcy initially undegone. For this reason, bankruptcy should be considered strategically.  When its gone, its gone, at least for a good long time!

The key point is that each debtor’s situation is unique and deserves special consideration. Further, because the process is hardly ever as smooth as it is supposed to be because of the complexities and pitfalls involved, it is advisable to consult a competent and compassionate attorney who has experience in bankruptcies and/or in negotiating modifications to guide you through the process and help you properly complete the paperwork.


MY AVVO.COM ANSWERS FEED:


©Christopher C. Carr, Attorney at Law 2009, 2016, All Rights Reserved

Christopher C. Carr, Esq. is a  Chester County Bankruptcy Attorney owner of Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA,  P.C., a quality Bankruptcy & Debt Relief Practice, located in  Valley Township, west of Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where Attorney Carr, who has over 30 years of diversified experience as an attorney, concentrates his practice on serving the residents of and businesses located within Western Chester, Southern Berks and Eastern Lancaster Counties in South Eastern Pennsylvania, including the communities in and around Atglen, Bird in Hand, Caln, Christiana, Coatesville, Downingtown, Eagle, Exton, Fallowfield Gap, Honeybrook, Lancaster, Lincoln University, Modena, New Holland, Parkesburg, Paradise, Ronks, Reading, Sadsbury, Sinking Spring, Thorndale, Valley Township, Wagontown, West Chester, West Lawn, & Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. Carr also has experience in many other areas of the law. If you reside or do business in the area and need assistance with a legal issue, please call Mr. Carr at (610)380-7969 or write him at cccarresq@aol.com today!

I also provide Mortgage Mod  and Debt Settlement Services.

IMPORTANT NOTE: I am not your bankruptcy lawyer, and nothing within this site creates that relationship.  Bankruptcy law requires that for me to be your lawyer, you and I must have a written contract.  So, unless we both agree in writing, you are not my client. Therefore, nothing written herein is to be relied upon as legal advice such as I might give to a client.

I am a debt relief agency. I help people file for bankruptcy relief under the bankruptcy code.